Dropping HFCS Doesn’t (Necessarily) Drop Dress Sizes

In Food, HFCS by Cathryn

In 2012, Americans consumed less high fructose corn syrup per person than they have since 1997. Dieters, who have become increasingly conscious of calories in HFCS sweetened beverages such as soda, have dropped their HFCS consumption but not the extra weight. Levels of obesity continue to grow despite waning HFCS consumption? How could this be when pseudoscientists such as the …

A Growing Problem

In HFCS by Cathryn

Does anyone remember the scientific method? In elementary school across the country, children learn this process by which scientists investigate phenomena, acquire new knowledge or correct what had been considered knowledge until that point. Following these simple steps, the testing of ideas remains unbiased and analysis stringent. It provides data which, if the tests are constructed properly, can be considered …

The Skinny on Sugar

In Food, HFCS by Cathryn

The percentage of Americans considered obese has skyrocketed over the past few decades. With 13 states on track to exceed a 60 percent obesity rate among adults by 2030, heated discussions about why our country continues to grow girthier and how to deal with the associated health risks grab headlines even during an election year. Dietary scapegoats abound with each …

Consumers Just Might Like HCFS Better

In Food, HFCS by Cindy

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) may have denied a petition to officially change the name of high-fructose corn syrup to corn sugar, but the marketplace might just discover consumers actually like HFCS better. After making a big deal two years ago about switching the recipe for Hunt’s Ketchup to include sugar instead of HFCS, ConAgra has apparently now quietly …

High Fructose Corn Syrup is Processed Food?

In Food, Guest Blogger, HFCS by Cathryn

Every now and then, the dedicated bloggers at Corn Commentary run across something so interesting and in-tune with what they want to say that they, with the permission of the original author, choose to share it in its full form.  While looking for new insight into the debate surrounding high fructose corn syrup, a blog post from twitter friend @thefarmerslife …

Defending the Right to Sweet Free Speech

In HFCS by Cindy

The right to free speech may be at stake in the legal battle over using the words “corn sugar” to describe the more technical term “high fructose corn syrup” or HFCS. In a lawsuit brought before a federal judge in Los Angeles this past week, sugar producers accused individual corn refining companies of false advertising in the Corn Refiners Association …

Important Study Shows: Confusing Messaging Works

In HFCS, Research by Cathryn

Recently, Market Watch from the Wall Street Journal  published a paid press release talking about two new studies that the Sugar Association touts as defending their position that high fructose corn syrup is intrinsically different from the processed cane and beet sweeteners they promote. Reference to a scientific study which neither mimicked an actual human diet nor compared the metabolic …

Want Naturally Sweet Eats?

In Food, HFCS by Cathryn

Corrections to hyped-up misperceptions can crop up in unlikely places.  Many people might assume that they already know what a magazine called The Natural Food Insider would publish regarding high fructose corn syrup.  Reading a recent article detailing nutritionist and weight-loss expert Joy Bauer’s advice to an industry-wide convention, it became evident that both Bauer and the publication want the …

Soda Bans Have Limited Impact

In Blogroll, Current News, Education, General, HFCS by Mark

The longest of journeys begins with a first step and perhaps the national idiocy over the evils of corn sugar (HFCS) may be about to subside. In the “Well Blog” in today’s New York Times they pronounce that soda bans in schools have limited impact. I know business professionals aren’t supposed to say “Duh” but this is a blog and …

Misconstrued Statements Aren’t So Sweet

In Activism, Current News, Food, General, HFCS by Cathryn

Frequently, CornCommentary serves as a place to correct the many errors, fallacies and misrepresentations that plague media coverage of agriculture.  With 98.5 percent of the population totally uninvolved in farming or farm-related activities and deep labor cuts at outlets across the country eliminating staff with any ag knowledge, this problem may seem endemic.  Other times, it becomes evident that controversy …